This Month:

Nimitz Sailor Volunteers To Preserve Bremerton Naval History

BREMERTON, Wash. (Aug. 14, 2016) Quartermaster 3rd Class Jeremy Bloom, a Sailor assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68), and a native of Chicago, shows and explains operations of the USS Turner Joy (DD 951) to a tourist during a walkthrough. This is one of many volunteer efforts made by Nimitz Sailors to connect and interact with the local community. Nimitz is currently undergoing an extended planned incremental maintenance availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility where the ship is receiving scheduled maintenance and upgrades. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Lauren K. Jennings/Released)

BREMERTON, Wash. – Quartermaster 3rd Class Jeremy Bloom, a Sailor assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and native of Chicago, along with local veteran volunteers guided tourists around the USS Turner Joy (DD 951) Sunday.

Turner Joy, most remembered for its participation in the Gulf of Tonkin incident which escalated the United States involvement in the Vietnam War, is now a public attraction maintained and manned primarily by volunteers. Volunteers dedicate their time towards preserving the flagship and educating the public about its lengthy maritime history.

BREMERTON, Wash. (Aug. 14, 2016) Quartermaster 3rd Class Jeremy Bloom, a Sailor assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68), and a native of Chicago, shows and explains operations of the USS Turner Joy (DD 951) to a tourist during a walkthrough. This is one of many volunteer efforts made by Nimitz Sailors to connect and interact with the local community. Nimitz is currently undergoing an extended planned incremental maintenance availability at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility where the ship is receiving scheduled maintenance and upgrades. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Lauren K. Jennings/Released)

QM3 Jeremy Bloom shows and explains operations of the USS Turner Joy (DD 951) to a tourist during a walkthrough.

 “It’s the volunteers who’ve made and still make this happen,” said John E. Gerten, retired Chief Torpedoman and curator of Turner Joy. “Younger generations will read about vessels like these, but the sea stories from active-duty and prior-service volunteers impact them more when they hear and see for themselves in person.”

As one of many tour guides available with naval experience, Bloom is able to further relate the shipboard experience to those who come to visit when telling his own personal stories. 

“It’s great to showcase and educate the public about a piece of history they didn’t know much about,” said Bloom. “It is amazing how people realize the facets of our life out to sea and how different it might be from theirs. The concept of watches to be stood, or the tiny racks we sleep in is surprising to most.”

Volunteer efforts like these are another avenue for Bloom and other Nimitz Sailors to positively connect with their local community and share their military experiences to the public while helping to keep a piece of history alive.

logosmallStory and photos by MC3 Lauren Jennings

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