This Month:

The Meaning Behind The Sailor’s Creed

131203-N-TW634-076 HARBOR (Dec. 3, 2013) Sailors stand at the position of parade rest while manning the rails of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as the ship enters Pearl Harbor. Nimitz is in Pearl Harbor for a scheduled port visit during their transit home after an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 5th, 6th, and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Derek A. Harkins/Released)

The Sailor’s Creed consists of five sentences that most Sailors were introduced to in basic training before they knew the gravity those words held. Even then, many Sailors knew that the words they were saying amounted to something much greater than themselves. Though the Sailor’s Creed is still a young naval tradition, it is a unifying tool around which many Sailors shape their lives.

A statement of intent, and a daily pledge to service, the Sailor’s Creed means something different to each Sailor aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) and through out the Navy.

“The Sailor’s Creed was written by a Blue Ribbon Recruit Training Panel in 1993 at the direction of Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Frank Kelso,” said Master Chief Personnel Specialist James Robertson, the leading chief petty officer of Nimitz’ Administration Department. “Kelso personally participated in the final edit of the group’s proposal and directed the finished product be given to every recruit, so they could commit it to memory.”

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The Sailor’s Creed was written as an ethos for all Sailors to live by in order to truly understand and support the Navy and the U.S. Constitution. It also closely mirrors the Oath of Enlistment.

“Being that the Sailor’s Creed derived from the Oath of Enlistment, it is the essence of what we do as Sailors,” said Robertson. “Our main focus is defending our great Constitution, regardless of who is trying to destroy it. Our jobs, our oath, our creed; they are all designed to protect our Constitution, and our rights granted to us from it.”

With just a few minor changes, the Oath of Enlistment eventually adapted to The Sailor’s Creed. In 1994, CNO Admiral Jeremy Boorda approved replacing the word “Bluejacket” with “Navy”, and in 1997 he changed “my superiors” to “those appointed over me.” Those changes were done with the intention of making the Sailor’s Creed more capable of spanning the gap from E-1 to O-10, and give the Navy as a whole a unifying statement.

Many Sailors across all ranks onboard Nimitz are able to find something to identify within the Sailor’s Creed.

“The Sailor’s Creed is a daily reminder of pride, upholding integrity and a mission statement for our lives,” said Operations Specialist 2nd Class Lisa Warren.

PEARL HARBOR (Dec. 3, 2013) Sailors man the rails of the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as the ship enters Pearl Harbor. Nimitz is in Pearl Harbor for a scheduled port visit during their transit home after an eight-month deployment to the U.S. 5th, 6th, and 7th Fleet areas of responsibility. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aiyana S. Paschal/Released)

*Archive photo

For Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Equipment) Airman Recruit Paul E. Britton III, the Sailor’s Creed isn’t just a saying, but a symbol.

“The Creed is the armor over your Navy Working Uniform,” said Britton. “It stands for everything you have done with your career and everything that has been done before you.”

The Sailor’s Creed may be a relatively new addition to the constantly changing customs of Navy tradition, but it has had an impact on Sailors since it was first conceived. For each Sailor, the creed may mean something different, but across all rates and ranks, it is a unifying pledge binding Sailors together in the name of honor, courage and commitment.

logosmallStory and photos by MC3 Chad Anderson

 

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